Saturday, July 25, 2015

Ireland, Day 13: Southeast Dublin

Several weeks ago, I had created a table in chart in which I researched and wrote out the days and opening hours of the places we wished to see while we were in Dublin. I managed to forget about that list almost as soon as I printed it, though, and left it at home, so last night Ed and I once again wrote out a list of the things we wanted to see, and divided them into sections. Today we visited several sites throughout southeast Dublin.

We bought tickets to see the Book of Kells (Leabhar Cheanannais), an illuminated manuscript Gospel book in Latin, containing the four Gospels of the New Testament together with various prefatory texts and tables. It was created in a Columban monastery in either Britain or Ireland or may have had contributions from various Columban institutions from both Britain and Ireland. It is believed to have been created ca. 800 AD. The text of the Gospels is largely drawn from the Vulgate, although it also includes several passages drawn from the earlier versions of the Bible known as the Vetus Latina. The manuscript takes its name from the Abbey of Kells. Trinity College has digitized the Book. One can't take pictures of the Book of Kells, of course, but we were able to spend some time in the Long Room at the Trinity College Dublin library, and it was glorious. It smelled like Old Library Smell.

From Ireland (2015)

I'm sure I've been to Trinity College Dublin before, but it's been several decades, so being the teacher that I am, it was spiffy seeing Parliament Square and some of the lovely old buildings.

From Ireland (2015)

Grafton Street was a few blocks away, and Ed wanted to see the Molly Malone statue, so off we went. The statue had been moved in July 2014 to Suffolk Street, a block west. "Molly Malone" is a song that tells the fictional tale of a fishmonger who plied her trade on the streets of Dublin, but who died young of a fever.

From Ireland (2015)

Our next stop was to check out the reading room in the National Library of Ireland; The walls were painted a light blue green, so the room itself was very airy and bright. We only stayed a few minutes before walking down the block to the National Museum of Ireland's Archaeology branch. There was a lot to see, including the original Tara Brooch in the Treasury exhibit; Iron Age bog bodies from Co. Meath in the Kingship and Sacrifice exhibit; a dugout canoe recovered from a bog (from Co. Sligo) and a passageway grave cemetery (Co. Sligo) from the Prehistoric Ireland exhibit; and a 9th century Viking Burial from Memorial Park (in Islandbridge, Dublin) from the Viking World exhibit.

From Ireland (2015)

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